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Frequently Asked Questions

Top Questions (6)

Tire rubbing is not directly caused by the suspension change it is the result of improper tire fitment or deviation from our pre-set ride heights.

The wheel & tire combination that we provide with our Touring kit will not induce tire rub.

Our Challenge kits utilize a more aggressive wheel and tire combination. Our instructions provide procedures for adjustment as needed.

We recommend against deviating from our wheel & tire fitment as well as our pre-set ride height.

No. Our suspension system is a balanced package not designed to be used with OEM springs.
 

Alignment settings are dependent on many factors including acceptable tire wear, the amount of straight line highway driving versus twisting street driving and the overall goal of the car. So first it is important to decide what types of driving the car will mostly do and what sacrifices you are willing to make. The following are 3 basic recommendations. The first is for a conservative street setup, the second an aggressive street setup and the third a track setup. First it's worthwhile to understand the tradeoffs of each setting. Toe: zero toe (or even toe out) is great for turns, but you sacrifice straight line stability. Camber: negative front camber is great for turns, but you sacrifice uneven tire wear and require more frequent mounting and balancing (and rotation) to keep tire wear manageable. Also, with the OEM solid upper control arms, your camber will be a factor of ride height. With adjustable upper control arms, ignore the ride height recommendations and set camber accordingly.

Conservative Street Setup
Between 1/16 and 1/32 TOE IN front and 1/32 TOE IN rear
Ride height at 25.875” front and 26.000” rear
(–1.0 camber front)

Aggressive Street Setup
Between 1/32 and 0 TOE IN on all four corners
Ride height at 25.500” front and 25.625” rear
(–1.5 to –1.75 camber front)

Track Setup
Between 0 and 1/16 TOE OUT on all four corners
Ride height at 25.000” front and 25.250” rear
(–2.0 to –3.0 camber front)

WARNING! The Track Setup alignment recommendations are not for the street and will result in serious straight line instability. STaSIS accepts no responsibility with its alignment suggestions.

We do not recommend the use of staggered wheel fitment. Any time that you increase the grip bias rearward, you induce greater under-steer into the chassis dynamics. There is no performance benefit in having a staggered wheel fitment, however you may run this setup as long as the front and rear rolling diameters are within 2-3% of each other.
 

Yes. The "Touring" system consists of our spring and roll bar package. The original dampers are retained, while the spring is changed. This enables the customer to maintain all components that Audi's drive select is comprised of.
 

We keep our downtime to an absolute minimum, 2-3 days in most cases.

Suspension (15)

Digressive damping describes the style of damper valving. Double-digressive simply means that the damper valving is digressive on both the compression and the rebound side of the damper. Digressive (as the name implies) means that the compression or rebound force will change or digress from a given path at some point. In comparison, a linear rate damper follows the same increasing path. The amount of digression and the point at which the compression or rebound digresses are part of the valving of the damper. For more information on digressive valving and how it compares to linear rate valving, see our write up in the Technology section.
 

Yes. The "Touring" system consists of our spring and roll bar package. The original dampers are retained, while the spring is changed. This enables the customer to maintain all components that Audi's drive select is comprised of.
 

A damper, also known as a shock or strut, has two ranges of motion. As the shaft of the damper extends out of the damper body, the damper is in rebound. In application, as your vehicle exits a bump, the dampers will rebound. The core function of rebound in a damper is to provide the roll control of the vehicle. Another function of damper rebound is to control the spring rate on the car. A car with too little rebound will be unable to control high spring rates. Much like putting an aggressive spring rate on a soft damper (like an OEM damper) will result in poor overall ride quality.
 

A damper, also known as a shock or strut, has two ranges of motion. As the shaft of the damper extends out of the damper body, the damper is in rebound. In application, as your vehicle exits a bump, the dampers will rebound. The core function of rebound in a damper is to provide the roll control of the vehicle. Another function of damper rebound is to control the spring rate on the car. A car with too little rebound will be unable to control high spring rates. Much like putting an aggressive spring rate on a soft damper (like an OEM damper) will result in poor overall ride quality.
 

A damper, also known as a shock or strut, has two ranges of motion. As the shaft of the damper compresses into the damper body, the damper is in compression. In application, as your vehicle enters a bump, the damper will compress. Compression damping is the primary factor in ride quality, road compliance and steering response. Compression force can also act as additional spring rate in a car. It is possible to run a strong compression damper, with a very soft spring. In comparison, it is not good to run a very strong spring with a very soft damper.
 

A STaSIS Track Sport suspension that runs a 600lbs front and 1000lbs rear will suit your performance needs. Note that the rear spring rate is measured somewhat differently due to the design of the suspension on these cars. This is a common and comfortable yet firm spring rate to match the 600lbs front springs. We have several A4q2.0 running this setup with great results.
 

Not really. We use Hyperco flat wound race springs in our Track Sport and Motor Sport suspension kits. Without modifying the upper and lower spring perches of a factory suspension, these flat springs will not fit correctly. In addition most dampers will not be properly valved to control the higher rate springs that we use. In order to utilize OEM upper and lower spring perches, you will need a taper wound spring that is designed around the OEM specifications of the vehicle (for taper size and overall length).
 

 No. Corner balancing is a great advantage to a car with adjustable ride height, however there are some aspects that make it insignificant in a streetcar. The amount of soft rubber bushings in the OEM suspension design makes for a decent amount of flex to the suspension. So even at a perfect 50.00% cross weight, the flex of these bushings will not provide that same 50.00% cross weight when loaded. However, the adjustable height suspension kits offer the ability to corner balance the car if so desired.

No, our Street Sport suspension uses Koni dampers with progressive springs. The damping which is preset from STaSIS is matched to the spring rate. These are adjustable units, which gives you the ability to adjust the damping to suit your specific driving style.

Many suspension kits are comprised of off-the-shelf dampers mated to a set of springs. These off-the-shelf dampers are typically valved to meet a range of vehicles and are produced in high volumes. STaSIS valved dampers are engineered specifically to each chassis increasing the complexity of the damper valving and drastically reduces the production volume. Additionally, STaSIS Track Sport and Motor Sport suspension kits utilize Hyperco flat wound race springs. These springs require CNC machined parts, adding more to the overall cost.

However, by using a standard race spring, customers can choose for a wide variety of available rates and customize the suspension in their car to meet their specific or changing needs. Given that flexibility, the STaSIS suspension can be tailored to suit your needs as well as modified over time as conditions and driving style grow.

Not right away. STaSIS recommends waiting 2 weeks after your suspension installation to have your car aligned. As long as ride heights at each corner are set correctly and all suspension fasteners have been torqued at ride height per the Service Manual requirements, no adverse affects on alignment will occur with the suspension installation. That being said, any minor alignment issues with a stock suspension (slightly off center steering wheel, slight pull to one side) can be exaggerated when the car is lowered. There are two reasons to wait 2 weeks. First, it is important to verify that the car is not doing anything out of the ordinary that it was not doing prior to the suspension install. The second reason is to allow the new dampers and OEM spring perches to settle. After this, an alignment is advised. For recommended alignment settings, see the frequently asked question: What are your recommended alignment settings?

No. Our suspension system is a balanced package not designed to be used with OEM springs.
 

Alignment settings are dependent on many factors including acceptable tire wear, the amount of straight line highway driving versus twisting street driving and the overall goal of the car. So first it is important to decide what types of driving the car will mostly do and what sacrifices you are willing to make. The following are 3 basic recommendations. The first is for a conservative street setup, the second an aggressive street setup and the third a track setup. First it's worthwhile to understand the tradeoffs of each setting. Toe: zero toe (or even toe out) is great for turns, but you sacrifice straight line stability. Camber: negative front camber is great for turns, but you sacrifice uneven tire wear and require more frequent mounting and balancing (and rotation) to keep tire wear manageable. Also, with the OEM solid upper control arms, your camber will be a factor of ride height. With adjustable upper control arms, ignore the ride height recommendations and set camber accordingly.

Conservative Street Setup
Between 1/16 and 1/32 TOE IN front and 1/32 TOE IN rear
Ride height at 25.875” front and 26.000” rear
(–1.0 camber front)

Aggressive Street Setup
Between 1/32 and 0 TOE IN on all four corners
Ride height at 25.500” front and 25.625” rear
(–1.5 to –1.75 camber front)

Track Setup
Between 0 and 1/16 TOE OUT on all four corners
Ride height at 25.000” front and 25.250” rear
(–2.0 to –3.0 camber front)

WARNING! The Track Setup alignment recommendations are not for the street and will result in serious straight line instability. STaSIS accepts no responsibility with its alignment suggestions.

Yes. The "Touring" system consists of our spring and roll bar package. The original dampers are retained, while the spring is changed. This enables the customer to maintain all components that Audi's drive select is comprised of.
 

We keep our downtime to an absolute minimum, 2-3 days in most cases.

Driveline (1)

No, we do not have a TorSen upgrade for the 016 transmission.

Braking (5)

The Allroad uses the same front braking setup as a '99-'01 S4 actually. So any of the brake kits we offer for the S4 will fit your Allroad. This includes 13", 14" and 14.5" with either an Alcon 4 piston or 6 Piston Monoblock caliper.

STaSIS recommends a 14" or larger due to the weight of the Allroad, however a 13" kit will suffice for general street use. With added stopping abilities you will have the great reward of improved pedal feel due to the caliper's stiffness. The Alcon Monobloc caliper design provides an extremely precise pedal feel which allows for excellent modulation abilities so you can get the most out of the brakes without getting into ABS activation. The full floating rotor assembly featuring Alcon rotors and STaSIS all aluminum hats are designed to be lightweight and resist warping.

The lightweight design of all of the products reduces unsprung weight aiding in suspension control and in turn, will improve ride quality over bumps and road anomalies.

Unlike most companies who have a street and race division of brake components, Alcon only produces race components. These calipers are designed and built in the UK using the same standards and testing methods as their Formula 1 cousins. Superior stiffness is provided by a unique, bridged monobloc construction. Further advantages include precision retraction seals, internal weather seals, insulated fluid pipes and machined airflow passages for pad and fluid cooling. These features come in a comparatively small and lightweight package, reducing unsprung mass and fit in a wide range of wheel fitments.

The OEM brake caliper has enough brake torque to initiate ABS, which is a clear indication that no increase in brake torque is required. However, the OEM sliding caliper system does have some drawbacks. A sliding caliper has a piston (or pistons) on the inside of the caliper, and a sliding bridge with a solid backing plate on the outside. As the caliper piston(s) extend, the bridge slides inboard and applies pressure to the outboard side of the rotor. In comparison, an opposed piston caliper has pistons in either side of the caliper. By removing the sliding bridge, you are removing much of the flex of the OEM brake system. To improve everyday brake “feel”, changing the caliper to an opposed piston one is a good move. It will provide a more linear brake pedal, with easier light brake modulation. .
 

A floating rotor has oblong holes instead of straight holes cut into the rotor flange to allow for thermal expansion. In comparison, a floating hat uses a hat with slots cut into it and a straight hole in the rotor flange. In order to provide a quiet street worthy brake system, our floating rotors incorporate an anti-rattle system that keeps tension on the rotor and hat thus eliminating any rattle, while still allowing for proper thermal expansion. Allowing thermal expansion of the rotor independent to the brake hat minimizes warping issues.
 

Alcon develops their products for the pinnacles of motorsport in Formula One, Champ Car and World Rally and that technology goes into every component that Alcon produces. Advanced metallurgy, multiple heat treatments, core material usage and sub 0.001 machining tolerances are what make Alcon rotors superior to anything else on the market. These factors all contribute to outstanding braking performance by: Maximizing heat absorption & dispersion and minimizing wear & vibration.
 

Wheels / Tires (2)

Tire rubbing is not directly caused by the suspension change it is the result of improper tire fitment or deviation from our pre-set ride heights.

The wheel & tire combination that we provide with our Touring kit will not induce tire rub.

Our Challenge kits utilize a more aggressive wheel and tire combination. Our instructions provide procedures for adjustment as needed.

We recommend against deviating from our wheel & tire fitment as well as our pre-set ride height.

We do not recommend the use of staggered wheel fitment. Any time that you increase the grip bias rearward, you induce greater under-steer into the chassis dynamics. There is no performance benefit in having a staggered wheel fitment, however you may run this setup as long as the front and rear rolling diameters are within 2-3% of each other.
 

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